Our Children Follow Our Rules: Family and Child Rearing in U.S. Muslim Migration

  • M. Gail Hickey Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (USA)

Abstract

The values and belief systems embraced by mainstream American society often conflict with contemporary immigrants’ values and belief systems. Eastern collectivist worldviews differ significantly from individualistic worldviews attributed to Europe and the United States. The degree of distance between immigrants' birth culture and resettlement culture is directly connected to the degree of acculturative stress. This study explored female immigrants' oral history narratives in an attempt to explore family acculturation issues from a U.S. Muslim perspective. Family and child rearing practices in Muslim and U.S. Muslim families are explored in this article.

Published
2013-08-09
How to Cite
HICKEY, M. Gail. Our Children Follow Our Rules: Family and Child Rearing in U.S. Muslim Migration. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Education, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 2, aug. 2013. ISSN 2166-2681. Available at: <http://isejournal.org/index.php/jise/article/view/38>. Date accessed: 14 nov. 2019.